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Hatred does not cease by
hatred, but only by love;
this is the eternal rule

THE BUDDHA


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The Sanskrit word samsara means "journeying." In Buddhism, as well as in Hinduism and Jainism, samsara is defined as a cycle of birth, death, and rebirth.

 

Samsara is sometimes thought of as a circumstance or an illusion. In Buddhism it is also thought of as the process by which karma causes rebirth.

 

Samsara is sometimes depicted as the opposite of Nirvana. However, the Mahayana school of Buddhism views both Nirvana and Samsara as mental representations. To one who appreciates the true nature of the world, Nirvana and Samsara are not different from one another.

Is samsara a place, or is it the process by which we create and re-create our own suffering? An essay by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

 

Is samsara a place, or is it the process by which we create and re-create our own suffering? An except from an essay by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

 

Samsara literally means "wandering-on." Many people think of it as the Buddhist name for the place where we currently live -- the place we leave when we go to nibbana. But in the early Buddhist texts, it's the answer, not to the question, "Where are we?" but to the question, "What are we doing?" Instead of a place, it's a process: the tendency to keep creating worlds and then moving into them. As one world falls apart, you create another one and go there. At the same time, you bump into other people who are creating their own worlds, too.
Extracts from About Buddhism